Cannonau Di Sardegna Reserva

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I’ve had a Twitter since early March.  I must say, few things have impressed me as much as Twitter and the awesome power of this product to dissimilate information to the world.  I remember the first tweet that caught my eye, “Who brought Macaroni to America?”  The answer, surprisingly, was Thomas Jefferson in 1802.  Turns out he wasn’t just America’s first wine geek, but he also got us hooked on Mac and Cheese!  The link also included some really good pasta recipes and got me hooked to a new blog.  The tremendous impact of social media hit me full force in the face.  For the first time in a long time I wish I was a young man just starting out in life, rather than counting down the days to retirement.  Social media is going to rock the marketing world.  This is exciting stuff!
 
But is it another “tweet” that beings us to this week’s wine.  As I was twittering along I saw this headline: “Dr. Oz world’s most healthy wine,” and I just had to click!
 
The wine is Cannonau Di Sardegna, a very good red wine from the Italian isle of Sardinia.  I was already hooked with the health aspect of the wine, but it’s also from Italy and the Island of Sardinia is some place I desperately hope to travel to this year. So, once again, off I went to the wine store.
 
According to the Dr. Oz program, people who drink this wine are 10 times more likely to live to be 100.  Traditionally, the first glass of wine is consumed around 10 AM, then another with lunch, another at “happy hour” (I don’t know what it is but I already like it), and the last at diner.  These are very small glasses, in total equal about two typical glasses of wine per day, that’s the magic number!
 
The reason, according to Dr. Oz’s guest Dan Buettner, is the Cannonau grape, which is also known as Garnacha, is the best wine on Earth for longevity.  It has the highest count of polyphenols in the world.  As explained in Mr. Buettnes’s book “Blue Zones” and in conjunction with National Geographic research they determined that Cannonau wine was directly linked to the longevity of the Sardinian population.  They linked that flavonoids in the wine with “moderate” consumption may increase life expectancy while also lowering stress levels.  I might need to buy a case…or six!
 
I thought to myself, “Okay, it has these great medicinal properties, but does it taste like cough medicine?”  Rest assured friends, absolutely not!  My bottle was from the vineyard of Sella & Mosca near the port of port of Alghero on the northwest tip of Sardinia.  The color was a rusty red that cleared when held to the light, while the aroma was very agreeable, I got violets.  The taste was warm on the palate, dry with lots of plumy flavors, then it settles nicely giving the drinker a very pleasant memory.
 
The grapes are harvested in late autumn, just about the time I plan to visit in late October.  Fermentation occurs in stainless steel vats lasts for about 15 days.  Then the wine is aged two years in Slavonia oak barrels and several months in bottles after that.  Let’s go through the checklist: great taste, long life, and low stress all for about $12, an incredible value if ever I heard one.
 
 
If I was to drink this wine as much as I would like to I’d live to be 200, in which case I am a young man!  Better get to work on my personal brand.  As always, thanks for stopping by, and if you get a chance drop me a line on Twitter or Facebook.  L’Chaim, to life!
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1 thought on “Cannonau Di Sardegna Reserva”

  1. We have this one at the store and it really is a great wine. I’m a big fan of Granache/Garnacha and the Italian version is wonderful.

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